Etiqueta: donde comprar camisetas de futbol

Find the Best Cheap Soccer Jerseys

Football fans are extremely passionate and are obsessed with the beautiful game. For any true football fan, wearing their club or countries latest soccer jerseys are a popular trend. However the price of replica kits is now extremely high so football fans search online in the home that they can find great bargains to buy cheap soccer jerseys.

There are many stores who sell soccer jerseys for cheap towards the end of the season, but this is normally because they are soon to be replaced by a brand new football shirt for the following season. Another good way to get discounts on your football kits is to become a member of a soccer fan club or team, so you can get a discounted price enjoyed by their members. Often you can find cheaper prices on soccer kits by following this method.

Or you can search online for stores who sell cheap football shirts at lower prices. Here, you can save up to 50% on the price of replica soccer shirts by buying wholesale soccer items and factory second items. Here, you can find the newest released football shirts with great service, including custom soccer jerseys for both kids and adults.

These stores will ship the item direct to your door so you don’t have to spend time searching in shops. You can find kits for all the best teams including Barcelona, Roma, Sampdoria, Real Madrid, Manchester United, Arsenal, Chelsea, AC Milan, Juventus, Liverpool, Inter Milan, Bayern Munich and Tottenham Hotspur.

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Netball Uniforms

There are many team sports in the world, but the more popular ones in descending order are soccer, cricket, basketball, baseball, rugby union and then field hockey. When you think of these you are typically drawn to a male oriented participation within all of these sports.

Over the last 10-20 years female participation has increased within these typically male dominated sports. There are now professional bodies accepting that women have a right to play these sports as much as their male counterparts. With the likes of FIFA running the women's game alongside the mens game as one voluntary organization.

When you think of netball you naturally think of it being a female sport, there are a minority of male teams and nations that play but these are few and far between. This is a ball sport played by two teams of seven players. It began during the 1890s in the UK and was formed from the early version of basketball predominately for participation by women.

During the 1960s the game became standardized and the INF-International Netball Federation was formed. Within the UK the game is associated to England Netball previously the All English Netball Association. There are over 92,000 affiliated members and over a million females put on their teams uniform to play every week.

Fairly recently netball has become a popular spectator sport, there has been a modernization of the game and many teams now have names such as' Manchester Thunder 'and' Scottish Sirens, with a very smart matching team uniform worn by the players. These teams are regularly watched by an ever growing amount and diversity of supporters every week.

There are 4 main leagues across the UK which teams can get promoted and relegated from. These leagues consist of teams from Scotland all the way to London. At the current time within the UK, players do not get paid a salary to play the sport, however further afield in Australia the top women players in the national league do get paid.

Team apparel or uniforms are an important part of any teams look, some of the most iconic kits in the world are probably football kits, the famous Brazilian yellow and blue or the famous red kit of the England 1966 world cup winning team. Many teams kits consist of team colors and badge. The kits that are worn are almost tribal, they associate the team, the players and supporters as one.

As a sports club the best ideas to find a new kit for the up and coming season is to look online. There are now online companies that offer you the chance to not only chose from a stock range of cuts, designs and colors but also allow you to design your own kit.

Sublimated uniforms are the next big thing within netball. Within the Australian professional league these type of kits are the latest trend. The normal kit design would be a certain color added to the front and back of the kit.

Sublimated uniforms use state state of the art techniques to create a design where the only limits are your imagination. This type of process can comprise a virtually limitless option of design and color in which the teams logo or crest can be include in the design.

Even on the high tech fabrics like mesh and lycra of today's uniforms the design can be transferred to using this type of technique. So do not begin the new season with a kit that does not give you the desire to go out on the court or pitch to play. Make sure you chose or design one that you feel a pride to play in.

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Most shared moments!


Take in the world’s most shared moments from a dramatic #UCLfinal 🙌

#SHARETHEDRAMA

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On Being a Fan – Why I Love West Bromwich Albion

I don’t really remember when I first became aware of football as a kid. It was just always there. Every scrap of wasteland was a pitch, every battered can a ball. WBA, Wolves and Villa graffiti was daubed on every pub car park wall and slashed into most of the red leather bus seats of the Midland Red fleet. In the Black Country, the heavily industrialised core of the West Midlands, football is totally tribal.

West Bromwich Albion were formed in 1880, one of the founder clubs of the first ever Football League, starting as the West Bromwich Strollers in 1878 formed by a dedicated group of manufacturing workers at the Salter Spring Works in West Bromwich. The club roots are therefore firmly knotted into the industrial heritage of the area and in its early years, workers from nearby heavy industry would flood through the turnstiles of the Hawthorns, their heavy industrial protective clothing giving rise to “the Baggies” tag which has been long used to refer to the club as well as the fans.

For me, football dominated childhood Saturdays during the season and talk was always of Albion. Legendary names like Jeff Astle and Ronnie Allen were as familiar as any other in the streets where I grew up. Our road was an ‘Albion road’ and all the scarves were navy and white. On home game Saturdays, garage doors would rise in unison and Ford Cortinas and Escorts would be reversed in formation before the mass driving over to West Bromwich to the ground we Albion fans now call “The Shrine.” Even to this day, 30 odd years later, the sight of those Hawthorns’ floodlights still send a shiver down my spine, sending me hurtling back to the days when the team ran out to the old reggae tune ‘The Liquidator’ by the Harry J Allstars and Bryan Robson wore the Captain’s no 7 shirt.

West Brom in the veins. That’s how it always been. The emotional attachment you feel to your local football club especially when its been handed down the family line is hard to explain to non-fans, but you can never walk away and my God at times you want to run. Supporting “The Baggies” is not for the lily-livered. You have to be stoical, very stoical.

Albion are as big a part of my family as any of us. Dad and Grandad were big Albion fans and this was passed to me and my brother like the family name via striped DNA. At games today, I often think about Dad, back in the 50s, sat on the railway sleepers that were wedged into the bank that is now the Birmingham “Brummie” Road End watching his beloved Throstles after leaving his bike down “someone’s entry” close to the ground. And then there’s my much beloved Grandad, Daniel Nock, long gone, who stood opposite where I sit now, in flat cap and rainmac, cigar in hand at the Hawthorns of the 60s when Albion flew high, winning the League Cup in ’66 and the FA Cup in ’68. The ground gives me the strangest feeling of being ‘at home’ it sounds corny but its true. For me, there is something very special about that place and I know that essential feeling won’t fade.

When I was growing up, football was everything and everywhere. Saturday afternoons were spent at my Nan and Grandad’s in Blackheath. Nan and I would listen to the match on the radio, waiting for Dad, Grandad, my brother and champion onion growing twin neighbours Ernie and Ivan, to return from the match. If we won, and in the late 70s this was more often than not, Grandad would come charging through the back door armed with chips and tales of my childhood hero Cyrille Regis and total Albion legend Tony ‘Bomber’ Brown. These were the days when I was told I was too young to go and Dad forbid it absolutely. I therefore had to rely on my brother’s tales of his experiences of the Smethwick End stand. Stories which I held in awe, tales of the crush of the terraces and the sporadic violence that by then was rising in the English game, of bricks and coins being thrown across thinly segregated fans.

In the late 1970s, West Brom were quite the golden team and this was a great time to be a fan, a welcome distraction for many from the pains of a severe economic depression that was hitting the Black Country hard, with the old steel and manufacturing industries that had propped up our communities for a century or more, beginning to falter and break down. Football took on an even stronger role for local people needing a focus and an escape.

In 1979, WBA finished third in the Old Division 1 and qualified for European football. This was the flair team still feted by fans today and only in the last two seasons have we seen (with some joy) an Albion side rise to anywhere near their level. Albion then fielded three black players in the same team, something that was then totally unknown in English football – Cyrille Regis, Brendon Batson and the wonderfully gifted, sadly late, Laurie Cunningham. These incredibly talented footballers became known to fans as ‘The Three Degrees’ and acted as pioneers of black players in football, inspiring a generation.

Cyrille was and still is a tower of a man and is still hugely loved and admired by Albion fans. A superbly strong, powerful player, he was to become for many the true benchmark of everything a centre forward should be. Brave, big, fast and the scorer of some absolute thumping belters from distance and beyond. He didn’t get knocked down very often. In late 2011, I was lucky enough to meet Cyrille while he was collecting for charity outside the Hawthorns before a home game. It was wonderful to tell him he was my Albion hero and I nervously but proudly showed him the back of my shirt as proof, emblazoned as it was with ‘Regis 9″. He seemed very surprised to see a fan with his name emblazoned on a recent home shirt and was as gracious as I’d always imagined him to be. It was a great moment for that WBA loving kid that’s still very much me.

Players like Regis, Batson and Cunningham had to face down hideous racism just to do what they did best, week in, week out. There is a much viewed video of West Brom’s famous 1978, 5-3 victory over Man Utd at Old Trafford on You Tube. In the footage, you can clearly hear Laurie Cunningham in particular, being booed repeatedly by the Man Utd fans. It is undoubtedly due to the colour of his skin and unusually for the times is even mentioned by commentator Gerald Sinstadt who makes reference to the “repeated booing of the black players’. The skill shown by Cunningham as he cuts through the United’s midfield is breathtaking. He simply carries on regardless and is described by Sinstadt as “booed but unperturbed”, showing what a truly skilful and wonderful football player he was. All three of these players responded to racism in this way and let their football make their response to the ignorance and the mindless chants. To me and hordes of other fans, ‘the Three Degrees’ made our club that bit more special and we took them to our hearts.

In terms of the Albion story, the years that followed on from the success of the late 1970s were mixed and difficult for Baggies fans. My first ever league game was West Brom v Liverpool in February 1981. We won that game 2-0 against the then league champions with a Bryan Robson miraculous back heeled goal. I guess as a kid, I thought this was always how it was going to be. It didn’t work out quite like that. I had to wait thirty more years to sit and watch my club do something truly special, when I was lucky enough to watch Albion beat Arsenal at the Emirates in a Premier League game in September 2010. But it was worth the wait. It was a joy to hear Albion fans on the phone to their loved ones after the game shouting “I feel like we’ve won the Cup!”… other young fans in their 20s proudly proclaimed on Facebook “This is the best day of my life!” It seems ridiculous but I know what they mean. That day in 1981 in the old Rainbow Stand with my Dad with his packet soup packed tartan flask and mini pork pies was one of mine and I’ll never forget it.

In 1992, I persuaded my Dad to come with me to go and see the Albion together for the first time in years. By then they we were languishing in what was the old Division 3. The Hawthorns was tatty and attendance was poor. We were playing Leyton Orient and the performance was lack lustre to say the least. I remember feeling gutted to see the club on its knees after what we had been and I know it was even harder on my Dad who’d see the joyous days of Jeff Astle. But, I was still heartened by the singing of the Brummie Rd and Smethwick End stands and the fact that the hardcore of supporters had stuck with the club. At half time, I went and touched the grass of the Hawthorns pitch, no one seemed to care that I jumped the barrier. It wasn’t the wonderful flair football I’d watched Albion play as a kid but at least we’d scraped a draw. There were many ups and downs to follow – too many to catalogue here – as Albion were to be crowned the classic ‘yo yo’ club – with successive promotions and relegations stressing the hell out of Albion fans for season upon season.

I met one of Albion’s promotion winning bosses, Roberto di Matteo, at Wembley in August 2010. Albion had seen promotion back to the Premier League under Di Matteo during the 2009-2010 Championship season. My friend approached Di Matteo and brought him over to have a photograph with me ‘for my Dad’ as she told him. I remember greeting him mumbling something about being a West Brom fan, probably with the kind of face a Chilean miner might look at his rescuer. God knows what he thought but he obliged with good humoured grace, guess I was remembering that cold, dark day in November 1992 and being ever so grateful for what he and others like Ardilles and Megson and Roy Hodgson after him had brought back to our club.

In 2010, my annual WBA membership renewal came through with a promo leaflet from the club emblazoned with a picture of the Hawthorns and Jeff Astle and had the words, “You were born a Baggie and you’ve been part of the team ever since” written across it. At first I thought it was a bit cheesy then I was surprised that it brought half a tear to the eye, because it’s true enough. It is about belonging and this is what the local football clubs we love do for us.

The club I was ‘born’ into has sometimes been the bain of my life but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Blue and white striped veins, or “Albion ‘til I die”, that’s just the way it is.

I hope to God the days of 1992 are banished for ever, but if they came back I know I’ll still love the club and always will. But I’d moan and we do like a good moan when we get going. That’s why we’ll keep singing Psalm 23 whatever the score – you never know when you are going to need some help to get to those green pastures and quiet waters. To this day, I’ll never tire of hearing thousands sing ‘The Lord’s My Shepherd’ in Black Country accents. It can be no coincidence that this is Albion’s football ‘hymn’ and you’ll hear it sung by fans at every match. If ever there was a hymn for the need for faith when you are facing the dark nights of the soul then this is it and my God there’s been a lot of those for us Albion fans. 3-0 up at half time, think you’re safe? Think again. Its what we call “typical bloody Albion” but try and make us stay away – we can’t. We are Albion.

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History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – A Thorough Look

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – Introduction

It should be noted that the primary motive for all the official changes in football rules is to improve the spirit of the game and make the game better in every possible way. Essentially, we will look at the major changes in the 19th century and the 20th century. As one can understand after going through this article, the game has undergone considerable changes in its rules over a period of time and this will be an ongoing process. As times change and new exploits are pointed out, the official game rules will continue to change either to fix or to improve the game.

Early Rules Changes

We should not forget that soccer existed hundreds of years before and people used to play football with varying rules during the initial days of football.

There were no proper common rules before 1863 to govern the game and changes in football rules were frequent during those initial periods. One of such two early rules that gained popularity are the Cambridge rules, first drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 and the Sheffield Football Club rules, formed by former public school pupils in 1857.

During the early 1860s, there were increasing attempts in England to unify and reconcile the various football games that were played in the public schools as well in the industrial north under the Sheffield Rules.

19th Century Changes

The first uniform football rules and regulations were formed in the year 1863.The Cambridge Rules are taken as a base and are rewritten to arrive at the first official laws of the game. In the year 1866, the offside law is changed to allow players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal.

The year 1891 is a very important year for soccer rules in particular and the game in general. A game changing rule called “the penalty-kick” was first introduced into the game. A penalty kick is awarded against a team which commits offence within the 18 yard box, also called the penalty box. This changed the game drastically and offered an immense advantage to the team that is awarded a penalty kick.

20th Century Changes

The year 1925 witnessed another major change in soccer “offside” rule. The offside law which is conceived in the year 1866 initially allowed players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal. The amendment in 1925 changed the number from three to two players.

Substitutes are permitted for the first time in the year 1958. But this confined only for an injured goalkeeper and one other injured player.

Card system is introduced in the year 1970. The system of red and yellow cards is introduced for the 1970 FIFA World Cup finals as a means of warning or penalising a player. Referees indicate that a player has committed an offense and red card represents more serious offense than the yellow card.

In 1990 the offside law is once again changed and this time in favour of the attacker. As per this change in law, the attacker is now said to be onside if he/she is in level with the penultimate defender.

Other changes include the Goalkeepers forbidden from handing back-passes in 1992. The technical area is introduced into the Laws of the Game in 1994, with the Fourth Official following the next year. Initially who were referred to as “Linesmen” are renamed as “Assistant Referees”, in the year 1996. In the year 1997 the Laws are revised once again for the betterment of the game.

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Does Mo Salah Have a Shot at Winning the Ballon D’Or?

This question has been on the minds of many football fans as they witnessed the performance of the 25-year old Egyptian forward over the course of the season. Sir Alex Ferguson had once told that Inside Forwards are more dangerous than traditional forwards. The Egyptian seems to be trying to prove Ferguson’s remarks true. He has shown explosive bouts of pace, exceptional fitness levels, extraordinary shooting accuracy and the form of his life.

So, once again, does Mo Salah have a shot at winning the Ballon d’Or? Not Quite Yet!

The reason is rather simple- Liverpool as a team have not won any silverware this season as of yet. So does this count? Yes, it does. Despite all his exploits, the team has not been successful in any major competition apart from the UEFA Champions League. Liverpool just won the first-leg of their semi-finals against AS Roma 5-2. Salah proved to be instrumental in this trashing of his old club yet again as he ended the match with 2 goals and 2 assists. He had managed to score seven goals in his 7 outings in the Champions League during the leadup to the Semi-finals. He has shown out of the ordinary striking form through-out the Premier League season. But unless Liverpool win the Champions League, his dream of winning the Ballon d’Or will remain just that, a dream.

But things have not always gone according to script for the Egyptian. His initial entry into the Premier League was with Chelsea, who bought him from FC Basel. But he could only make 13 appearances and score 2 goals before being loaned-off to Italian side, Fiorentina. He was then loaned to AS Roma who bought him from Chelsea for a complete transfer. He enjoyed considerable success at the club. Liverpool then bought from Roma before the start of the 2017-18 season. Many of the experts voiced their doubts about Salah’s ability to adopt to the Premier League. But all of them have been silenced now, given his performance and sheer attacking prowess he has shown.

Salah also helped Egypt qualify for the FIFA World Cup 2018, their first appearance since the 1990 World Cup. He emerged as Egypt’s top scorer during the qualifying tournament and scored both the goals in the all important match against Congo. He has so far scored 43 times for Liverpool during this season and is only behind Ian Rush in the all time top goal scorer’s for the club in a single season.

Mo Salah has already been named as the Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the year. So let us hope Liverpool will maintain their momentum and take their current form into the second leg against AS Roma.

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AC Milan’s Dutch Trinity: Van Basten, Gullit and Rijkaard Showing Unique Soccer Skills

AC Milan, the reigning champion, won the Italian league 18 times now. A remarkable period in their rich history was highlighted by Dutch influence. The Dutch stars Ruud Gullit, Frank Rijkaard and Marco van Basten played a major part in the club’s successes in the late 80’s and first half of the 90’s. National and international titles found their way to Milan and to this day Milan fans and (former) players still express their gratitude.

Gullit and Van Basten joined the club in 1987, Rijkaard one year later. At first, it was Gullit who had the biggest influence. Charismatic Dutch captain Ruud Gullit’s first season at Milan saw the club win the “Scudetto” for the first time in 9 years. To sign Gullit, AC Milan paid the world record transfer fee (at that time) to PSV Eindhoven. But they earned that back in no time.

Marco van Basten played for Ajax in Amsterdam before moving to AC Milan. In Holland, he became the top scorer in the league for four seasons from 1983 to 1987, scoring 117 goals in 112 matches. In 1987, he also scored the only goal in the UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup final. That was the last European trophy Ajax was missing. So it was a great “going-away” present to the club, as a new adventure awaited in Italy.

Like Van Basten, Frank Rijkaard took his first professional steps on the pitch playing for Ajax. He lived in the same part of Amsterdam as Ruud Gullit during their teenage-years. After becoming Europe’s best with Holland in 1988, he completed AC Milan’s Dutch Trinity. In the end each played a significant role in the career of the other.

AC Milan was almost invincible and played a revolutionary type of soccer, demonstrating skills hardly ever seen before in the Serie A. This was part of the owner’s Master plan. In 1986 entrepreneur Silvio Berlusconi acquired the club and saved it from bankruptcy. Berlusconi got manager Arrigo Sacchi to lead the team to success. He was followed up by Fabio Capello, England’s current manager. The “Rossoneri” signed the Dutch trio, where they already had players like Franco Baresi, Paolo Maldini and Carlo Ancelotti. This was the start of arguably the most successful era in the history of AC Milan.

During the time of the Dutch trinity (1987-1994) they managed to win four domestic titles, reach the final of the Coppa Italia in 1990 and won four Supercoppa Italiana. They were also a force to be reckoned with in Europe. They won three Champions League trophies, three UEFA Super Cups and two Intercontinental Cups. In all of this the Dutch players effectively used their super soccer skills. AC Milan won the 1989 Champions League final with 4-0 against Steaua Bucuresti. Gullit and Van Basten both scored 2 goals and Van Basten become top scorer with 10 goals in total. The year after it was Frank Rijkaard’s turn. In the final against Benfica he scored the only goal, Van Basten provided the assist.

Along with Boca Juniors, Milan won more FIFA recognized international club titles than any other club in the world. There is no denying the Dutch trinity played their part.

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🇷🇺 CSKA Moskva and Russia defender Sergei Ignashevich has ended his playing care…

🇷🇺 CSKA Moskva and Russia defender Sergei Ignashevich has ended his playing career at the age of 38. 👏👏

🏆 UEFA Cup winner 2005
🥇 6 x Russian Premier League winner
✔️ Russia’s most-capped player (127 apps)




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A Short Biography of Famous Soccer Player Fabien Barthez

His complete name is Fabien Alain Barthez. He was born on 28 June 1971 in Lavelanet, France. His playing position in the field is as a Goalkeeper. He is an ex-French soccer goalkeeper who collected awards with Manchester United and the national side of French. Barthez attained the 1998 FIFA World Cup and also Euro 2000.

Barthez experienced playing football with a number of senior clubs and they are Toulouse (1990-1992), Marseille (1992-1995), AS Monaco (1995-2000), Manchester United (2000-2004), Marseille (2004-2006), and Nantes (2006-2007).

In 1991, when he was 21, Barthez began his professional and outstanding career with the Toulouse club. Afterward in 1992he played for Marseille. The next year Barthez would play a vital part in his squad’s success for the period of European Cup by doing a really high excellence match.

As long as his career as a professional soccer player, he collected some honors with club, national teams and also individual honors. With his clubs he reached:

Toulouse (French Cadet Championship: 1987)

-Marseille (UEFA Champions League: 1993),

-Monaco (Ligue 1: 1997, 2000; French Champions Trophy: 1997), and

-Manchester United (Premier League: 2000-2001, 2002-2003).

In international level he got:

FIFA World Cup: 1998, UEFA European Championship: 2000, and FIFA Confederations Cup: 2003.

And some of his individual honors are: Yashin Award: 1998, Ligue 1 Goalkeeper of the Year: 1998, IFFHS World’s Best Goalkeeper: 2000, European Footballer of the Year Best Goalkeeper: 1998, 2000, Most-capped France goalkeeper: 87, All-time France World Cup appearances: 17, and Most World Cup clean sheets: 10.

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