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Short Biography of Famous Soccer Player – Sepp Maier

His full name is Josef Dieter “Sepp” Maier. He was born in 28 February 1944. He is one of former professional German players of soccer with position as goalkeeper.

He was born in Metten, Bavaria. He spent the total of his proficient playing career at Bayern Munich, succeeding the Bundesliga Championship four times and the European Cup three times successively. Sepp” Maier played between 1966 and 1977 in an unremitting series of 422 matches, still a German national record.

Sepp Maier was one of the greatest goalkeepers as long as a period which saw a lot of great goalkeepers rise to prominence, especially in Europe. He was chosen West German soccer player of the year three times.

Sepp Maier’s goalkeeping aptitude was matched simply by his eccentricity, seeing that Maier was considered as a bit of a joker by many players and fans. This impression was augmented in one game which Bayern were dominating without difficulty, Maier turned his consideration to hunting a duck which had got stricken in the Olympia Stadion, rather than focus on the game.

Apart from his sense of humor, he was a really great keeper, who had the fate of winning nearly each competition he played in at least once, including a World Cup for West Germany in year 1974, a European Championship in 1972, the Intercontinental Cup in 1976, UEFA Cup Winners Cup in 1967, European Cup in 1974, 1975, 1976, and Bundesliga in 1969, 1972, 1973, 1974.

His greatest achievement came in 1974 when he assisted his national part to triumph in the Football World Cup 1974, World Cup final in his home city of Munich. In total he took part in his country 95 times.

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Shaqiri’s first day at Liverpool


👋 Xherdan Shaqiri settles in at Liverpool FC! 🔴

Where’s his best position? No10? Wide right? 🤔🤔🤔

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🇫🇷 Raphaël Varane or 🇭🇷 Luka Modrić will complete a #UCL and #WorldCup double …

🇫🇷 Raphaël Varane or 🇭🇷 Luka Modrić will complete a #UCL and #WorldCup double today.

Who will it be? 🤔


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Chivas USA Soccer Team – Its Accomplishments

Chivas is one of the famous USA soccer team and won the heart of many fans. It is a professional soccer club based in Carson, California United States and a member of Major League Soccer. It was founded in 2004 and was the eleventh team of the league.

Chivas has also gained numerous titles and trophies. The team stated to bloom in 2006, their head coach Bob Bradley was named MLS Coach of the year and defender Jonathan Bornstein was named 2006 Rookie of the Year. In 2007, the team third’s season which is the most successful year for the team, they have also won awards. Their new coach Preki was named MLS Coach of the year and goalkeeper Brad Guzan was named MLS Goalkeeper of the year.

On August 13, 2006 Chivas played a 100-Hour Soccer Game which is the longest record in the USA soccer history. It was held in the city of Bell Gardens, with Chivas playing against 2,000 participant soccer teams. It was in celebration of Club Deportivo Guadalajara’s 100th anniversary. Merely 20,000 soccer teams watched and support the event.

In the 2008 Season, Chivas has tied up with the LA Galaxy and indeed a good start for the team. Until now Chivas has continue its soaring career and its popularity. Fans are becoming more passionate and supportive to the team; they formed a fans club named Ultra Unions. This will be a good start for the US to recognized soccer as one of the popular sport like in Europe and for them to be known to the whole world.

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Building and Managing a High School Soccer Program

The following interview is with Coach Bill Bratton, who was my Soccer Coach at Cross Keys High School in Atlanta, Georgia for the school year 1989-1990. I asked him for an interview to share his thoughts on Soccer. He has been involved with Soccer for over 25 years so I wanted to pick his brain on the subject.

Stafford:

Hello Coach, you have been coaching high school soccer for over 25 years. How did you first get involved in the sport?

Coach Bill Bratton:

Hi Stafford and thank you. Well I started coaching soccer in 1982 in DeKalb County in my first year teaching at Sequoyah High. The previous coach had left and the school needed someone to coach. The principal offered me the opportunity to take over the program.

Stafford:

How was that experience for you and how did you prepare for this new role as a High School Soccer Coach?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I will admit I had never played or coached soccer before. In the off season I spent time preparing and learning by reading books and going to clinics. I will also admit that the players knew more about the skills, the formations and what it took to play the game than I did but it was the coaching organization of putting a team together to play as a team that was my strength. I really enjoyed coaching soccer once I mastered the knowledge I needed.

Stafford:

How long did you coach at Sequoyah and how did you end up at Cross Keys?

Coach Bill Bratton:

I coached Sequoyah for 4 years before DeKalb began a consolidation program and I transferred to Cross Keys in 1986. I had the privilege of coaching the Keys program for the next 20 years. I earned my Georgia class D coaching license as well as a Class C level National Coaching license from the USSF. The situation at Cross Keys was much like Sequoyah, they needed a new soccer coach and the AP who would become the principal offered me the position.

Stafford:

How was the situation at Cross Keys, and what did it take to build the program?

Coach Bill Bratton:

It took hard work and discipline to build the program. My job involved rebuilding a program. It had lost its organization, discipline was amuck, and the program wasn’t winning, just 2 years from finishing 3rd in the state. I had to incorporate discipline into the program and to teach players what playing on a school competitive team meant and was needed to win. This progress was going to take many years to complete.

Players would tell me “Coach we just want to play”. Cross Keys was a highly transient school. It was a constant rebuilding progress every year. They had no understanding of playing as a team, that they had to come to practice, to commit, and to be successful they had to play as a team. As I look back that took 2-3 years to get across. Once we reached the point of players returning consistently, I started instilling in the players that we were playing to win. They were playing in a competitive environment. If they just wanted to play there were rec teams, club teams, and other leagues they could go and “just play”.

There were teams that we could beat just based on talent and skill alone so we had to start winning those games. Slowly players started to understand, but they had no knowledge of what playing for a State Championship” was or meant. But we started to win games we should of and it was time to go to the next level, winning games that were 50-50. Again this level took 3-4 years to develop. I constantly had to preach to the teams what we were out there to accomplish. We wanted to win games and develop. After getting to the point of winning 50-50 games, we needed to win games that we were not expected to win. Our goal was to make the region playoffs to go to the state playoffs. The final step in the development was to defeat teams no one expected us to. It was always my belief that we had the ability, the skills to play with anyone and defeat anyone on any given day. In my last 5 years at the Keys we had two teams to reach the 2nd round (sweet 16) level of the state playoffs.

Stafford:

Awesome! I see a pattern here and a valuable lesson to be learned. An opportunity was presented; Rather than turn it down because you had no prior experience in soccer at that time, you made the effort to learn about the subject by spending time ” preparing and learning by reading books and going to clinics”, etc. You mentioned it took work and discipline and eventually you mastered the knowledge that was needed to coach high school soccer, which I saw when my old high school merged with Cross Keys and I ended up playing for you in my senior year. You seemed to have had a passion for soccer and knowledge of the game and the know-how to get players excited for the game and team unity. But all of that was accomplished through your own hard work and effort. How important is “discipline” for the aspiring soccer player and anyone in general?

Coach Bill Bratton:

Let me start out by saying that I believe discipline is an important attribute for anyone to have. To achieve individual or team goals one must have self-discipline. Discipline can have many different meaning to each person. It can be a commitment to attending practices, to going beyond what is asked of one to do to prepare. Discipline comes from having goals and achieving goals come from being disciplined. Some say that my teams were disciplined. On a team there can be only one chief who must lead and lead by setting the discipline of what is expected from others. The others must be willing to accept the standards and work together to achieve for the benefit of the whole and not the individual. If the team has discipline many other honors will come their way.

For many years as the coach I would tell the teams our goals, the purpose of what we will be trying to achieve, and that to reach these ideals we must all be on the same page. Some years I would have players who as the season would progress would disagree with the discipline and feel that certain things were unfair. They would question the purpose, the lineup, and the style of play or other team discipline. Of course I would try to talk with them, explain what was being done and why, listen to their side of the picture. I always had an open door if a player wanted to talk or discuss issues but not in public or at practice or during a game. I recall one instance where 5 players who I had taken out of a game and disagreed with my decision that they left the team bench and set in the stands. These players were removed from the team immediately after the game. On another team years later the players felt the formation we were playing and the players in those positions was wrong. This time I gave that team the chance to play the players and the formation they felt we needed to be playing. I said you have a half to show me that I am wrong and if it doesn’t work it will be done my way and there will be no more discussion and if you cannot agree with my decisions you have a decision that only you can make. Well the team’s way didn’t work so at halftime I told the team I gave you your opportunity now it will be done my way.

I always in my 26 years of coaching have told every team that I coach (you might recall this)… I don’t care who you are, I don’t care how good you are (even if you are the best player), or who you know… If you have to be disciplined you will be disciplined. No matter how much it might hurt the team, you know the rules and you know if you break the rules you will be disciplined and I will discipline you.

Stafford:

Thanks Coach. Have you had any experience with Club Soccer (soccer outside of the school system)? What is your thought on Club Soccer and its impact on High School Soccer? For example, some players who play high school soccer in the Spring may have Club teams that they play for that trains Summer, Fall and even Winter!

Coach Bill Bratton:

My experience on coaching Club has been limited as I coached one year with a U-14 boys’ team with Roswell Santos club league. We won the Fall and Spring season championship. A few years later I worked with Concorde Soccer coaching a U-12 boys team for a year.

If a player is looking to be seen and has the dream of playing at the college level then the club system is the way to go. But keep in mind that this is for elite level players. If they are good enough there is a program that they can go through to reach a higher level of play if they have the talent. First is to be selected on a top level team, to try out for the State select teams, to reach Regional recognition, etc. In the summer they should attend a quality soccer camp to improve their skills and to be seen by college coaches. In high school some club coaches look down at the high school programs and encourage players not to play on their school teams for a lack of quality coaching, getting injured, lack of talent, and low level of play from many schools.

I encourage my players to find a club team to play on in the off seasons as it can only help to make them better. In the Fall if they are not playing on a club team, I encourage players to practice Cross Country to start developing their stamina and if possible to go out for wrestling in the Winter. Some club players come into the High School level and will tell me they can only play a midfield or an outside wing position. I try to teach my players that even though they played center midfield on their club team they are a great fit in the defense on the school team. Players need to keep an open mind and be willing to play the position that will give the team they are on the opportunity to be competitive and a chance to win.

Stafford:

Thanks Coach! Having been a club coach for several years, I can relate to the statement “some club coaches look down at the high school program and encourage players not to play on their school teams from a lack of quality coaching, getting injured, lack of talent, level of play from many schools.” Not that I have ever made that statement. However, that statement may have had some validity in the past, but do you see this changing as new generation of teachers who may be coaching high school or middle school presently are actually former soccer players who are also teachers, but may want to use the high school experience as a career path for some form of College/Professional coaching? This may be the case for some private schools.

Coach Bill Bratton:

Yes I see this getting better. The coaching at the high school level has shown major improvement in the coaches’ knowledge of the game. High schools teams now, like club teams can hire community coaches to help coach teams now and pay a stipend. These individuals must take the state required courses to become a community coach and follow the rules of the school, the county and state as they coach. So high school coaches who might lack in the skills and able to find someone willing to coach to teach/work coaching the players the skills or to work on the strategies and tactical aspects of the game. This is what many club teams do now. They have a person to run the run but pay hundreds of dollars a month for a named/quality individual who was a former player, etc to actual do the coaching.

Stafford:

****Coach Bratton retired in 2006, but after 7 years he wanted to get back into coaching and took over the varsity boys position at a High School in Fulton County (Georgia) as a community coach. It was great speaking to him again after so many years. ****

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History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – A Thorough Look

History of Changes in Soccer Football Rules – Introduction

It should be noted that the primary motive for all the official changes in football rules is to improve the spirit of the game and make the game better in every possible way. Essentially, we will look at the major changes in the 19th century and the 20th century. As one can understand after going through this article, the game has undergone considerable changes in its rules over a period of time and this will be an ongoing process. As times change and new exploits are pointed out, the official game rules will continue to change either to fix or to improve the game.

Early Rules Changes

We should not forget that soccer existed hundreds of years before and people used to play football with varying rules during the initial days of football.

There were no proper common rules before 1863 to govern the game and changes in football rules were frequent during those initial periods. One of such two early rules that gained popularity are the Cambridge rules, first drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 and the Sheffield Football Club rules, formed by former public school pupils in 1857.

During the early 1860s, there were increasing attempts in England to unify and reconcile the various football games that were played in the public schools as well in the industrial north under the Sheffield Rules.

19th Century Changes

The first uniform football rules and regulations were formed in the year 1863.The Cambridge Rules are taken as a base and are rewritten to arrive at the first official laws of the game. In the year 1866, the offside law is changed to allow players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal.

The year 1891 is a very important year for soccer rules in particular and the game in general. A game changing rule called “the penalty-kick” was first introduced into the game. A penalty kick is awarded against a team which commits offence within the 18 yard box, also called the penalty box. This changed the game drastically and offered an immense advantage to the team that is awarded a penalty kick.

20th Century Changes

The year 1925 witnessed another major change in soccer “offside” rule. The offside law which is conceived in the year 1866 initially allowed players to be onside provided there are three players between the ball and the goal. The amendment in 1925 changed the number from three to two players.

Substitutes are permitted for the first time in the year 1958. But this confined only for an injured goalkeeper and one other injured player.

Card system is introduced in the year 1970. The system of red and yellow cards is introduced for the 1970 FIFA World Cup finals as a means of warning or penalising a player. Referees indicate that a player has committed an offense and red card represents more serious offense than the yellow card.

In 1990 the offside law is once again changed and this time in favour of the attacker. As per this change in law, the attacker is now said to be onside if he/she is in level with the penultimate defender.

Other changes include the Goalkeepers forbidden from handing back-passes in 1992. The technical area is introduced into the Laws of the Game in 1994, with the Fourth Official following the next year. Initially who were referred to as “Linesmen” are renamed as “Assistant Referees”, in the year 1996. In the year 1997 the Laws are revised once again for the betterment of the game.

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Victor Nosa Ikpeba – The Undisputed Prince of Monaco

The electrifying Victor Ikpeba began his career at the now defunct African Continental Bank F.C of Lagos, before representing Nigeria U-17 squad that took part in the 1989 FIFA U-17 World Cup held in Scotland. His performance at that tournament convinced football scouts from Belgium to recruit him into modest Belgian club side- RFC Liege. He soon established himself as a clinical finisher after making 79 appearances and scoring 27 goals for the Belgian team.

In 1994 French club- Monaco F.C then coached by the present Arsenal tactician Arsene Wenger snapped gave snapped him up. Victor Ikpeba had the most eventful time of his football career at Monaco, as he helped the French club win the League title. He also got an invitation into the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Soccer squad of Nigeria. The Team eventually won Gold after defeating Argentina in the final.

The icing in the cake of the Delta State born Footballer came in 1997 when he won the African footballer of the year award after a wonderful season with Monaco. He played a total of 169 games and scored 55 goals for the Monaco team. This enviable feat earned him the nickname- “The Prince of Monaco”.

After leaving Monaco for Borussia Dortmund in 1999, his career took a nose-dived which eventually became worse in the 2000 after the demise of his young wife- Atinuke through breast cancer. Subsequent efforts to revive his career with Real Betis of Spain, Al-Ittihad of Libya and Charleroi F.C of Belgium did not yield much fruit, as he eventually retired from active football in 2005.

It is pertinent to note that Victor Ikpeba was an integral part of the Super Eagles squad from 1993- 2000. He played a total of 30 matches and scored 3 goals for the Super Eagles of Nigeria in all competitions.

His worst miss came in the African Cup of Nations final jointly co-hosted by Nigeria and Ghana in 2000 when he scored in the penalty shoot-out against Cameroon but thought the ball had not crossed the line. He held his head in disbelieve and the referee and his assistant ruled that it was not a goal. Television replay later showed that the whole of the ball actually crossed the line. Nigeria eventually lost the game.

He was a member of the Super Eagles squad that participated at the 1994 African Nations Cup held in Tunisia as well as the 1994 and 1998 FIFA World Cups held in the United States and Spain respectively. He his presently a sports analyst with South African based Super Sports Channel television.

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️ Riyad Mahrez joins Manchester City What difference will he make? 🤔

✍️ Riyad Mahrez joins Manchester City

What difference will he make? 🤔




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A Short Biography of Famous Soccer Player – Carlos Tevez

Tévez is an Argentine professional soccer player who currently plays for English club Manchester City. His complete name is Carlos Alberto Tévez. He was born in Ciudadela, Buenos Aires, Argentina on 5 February 1984. He was raised in the neighbourhood of Ejército de Los Andes, better recognized as “Fuerte Apache”. So that, he gained the nickname is “El Apache”. In the field, he always plays as a Forward. Teves has made more than 50 caps for his national team of Argentina, making 11 goals.

Teves is presently considered as one of the most talented prospects to emerge from Argentina. Carlos Tevez is a skilled Argentina soccer player who has wonderful soccer abilities. He is a very spirited player. Bravery and Strength are the trademarks of his style. Akin to his colleague Lionel Messi, he has been named as the “new Diego Maradona”. Maradona him self described him as the “Argentine prophet for the 21st century”.

In club level, Teves has experienced playing for Boca Juniors (2001-2004), Corinthians (2004-2006), West Ham United (2006-2007), Manchester United (2007-2009), and Manchester City (2009 -). In 2008, after assisting the club of Manchester United won the UEFA Champions League, Teves made a controversial pronouncement to leave to Manchester City.

Carlos Teves has collected many honors and awards for his career as a professional soccer player. In club level, with Boca Juniors he won Primera División (2003 Apertura), Copa Libertadores (2003), Copa Sudamericana (2004), and Intercontinental Cup (2003). With Corinthians he won Campeonato Brasileiro Série A (2005). And with Manchester United he won Premier League (2007-08, 2008-2009), FA Community Shield (2008), UEFA Champions League (2007-2008), FIFA Club World Cup (2008), and Football League Cup (2008-2009).

In international level, he got Summer Olympics in 2004 and South American U-20 Championship in 2003. As individual player, some of his honors are Copa Libertadores (Most Valuable Player: 2003), Silver Olimpia (Argentine Footballer of the Year: 2003, 2004), Golden Olimpia (Argentine Sportsperson of the Year: 2004), Olympic Golden Boot (2004), CBF Campeonato Brasileiro (Best Player: 2005), Placar Bola de Ouro (2005), South American Footballer of the Year (2003, 2004, 2005), Hammer of the Year (2007), FA Premier League Player of the Month (2009), PFA Player of the Month (March 2010), Manchester City Official Supporter’s Player of the Year (2009-2010), and Manchester City Player’s Player of the Year (2009-2010).

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